Author Archives: Sophia

About Sophia

Sophia Brueckner, born in Detroit, MI, is an artist and engineer. Inseparable from computers since the age of two, she believes she is a cyborg. She received her Sc.B. in Computer Science and Applied Mathematics from Brown University. As a software engineer at Google, she worked on the front-end development and interface design of products used by tens of millions and later on experimental projects within Google Research. Brueckner earned her MFA in Digital + Media at the Rhode Island School of Design and was also an instructor there teaching a course on science fiction and art. Her artwork has been exhibited internationally, and, in particular, she is interested in interaction design, generative art, algorithmic writing, and, as a technology antidote, painting. She feels an urgency to understand and bring awareness to technology's controlling effects, and to encourage the ethical and thoughtful design of new technologies. She recently joined the MIT Media Lab as a graduate student in the Fluid Interfaces group. http://www.sophiabrueckner.com

ballard on ubuweb

some films you can watch here: http://www.ubu.com/film/ballard.html

reconfigurable mazes

mentioned this project in class last night:

http://www.northpitney.com/works/maze/maze.html
and another: http://www.designboom.com/art/kinetic-moving-maze-by-nova-jiang/

Empathy for military robots could affect outcomes on the battlefield

“They would say they were angry when a robot became disabled because it is an important tool, but then they would add ‘poor little guy,’ or they’d say they had a funeral for it,” Carpenter said. “These robots are critical tools they maintain, rely on, and use daily. They are also tools that happen to move around and act as a stand-in for a team member, keeping Explosive Ordnance Disposal personnel at a safer distance from harm.”

“You don’t want someone to hesitate using one of these robots if they have feelings toward the robot that goes beyond a tool,” she said. “If you feel emotionally attached to something, it will affect your decision-making.”

Full article on PBS